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Aquatic Invasive Species: Cuban Bulrush

Overview

Cuban bulrush is currently invading many multi-use lakes, reservoirs, and flowing waters across the southeastern United States. These waterbodies provide the public with drinking water, hydro-electric power, navigation for commercial and military vessels, food in the form of fish and other aquatic life, and quality of life services such as outdoor recreational opportunities. The dense growth of Cuban bulrush can also prevent the growth of more desirable aquatic plant species which will impact the aquatic food web, especially economically important fish species. In the last 20 years, Cuban bulrush has become more prevalent in the southeastern U.S. and is therefore receiving more attention from resource managers. In 2020, the state of FL spent over $625,000 to manage Cuban bulrush. However, because research regarding the control of Cuban bulrush has been lacking, resource managers are having difficulty controlling nuisance populations. The purpose of this work is to 1) develop new control methodologies and 2) gain a better understanding of the Cuban bulrush life cycle to help resource managers better time management activities.

The purpose of this project was to:
  • develop new Cuban bulrush control methodologies
  • gain a better understanding of the Cuban bulrush life cycle to help resource managers improve time management activities

Project Personnel

Dr. Gray Turnage
Associate Research/Extension Professor
Geosystems Research Institute
Mississippi State University
Dr. Ryan M. Wersal
Assistant Professor
College of Science, Engineering & Technology
Minnesota State University
Dr. Chris Mudge
Research Biologist
US Army Corps of Engineers
University of Louisiana
Dr. Berry Sperry
Research Biologist
US Army Corps of Engineers
University of Florida

Funding

This work was supported with funding through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Army Corps of Engineers (ERDC).

Period of Performance

Ongoing